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Lake Pleasant Results.

The first weekend of racing at Lake Pleasant scores are posted on the results page, or click here.

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores from the second week of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or click here.

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores for the first week of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or by clicking here.

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores for week 7 of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or click here.

TTL-Debbie Borgman Photos (18 of 23)

Paul Miachika leading the Lasers. Photo: Debbie Borgman

Multi-Hulls Rule: Jim Tomes Wins 2015 Governor’s Cup

Jim Tomes and that Great Big trophy. Photo: Mike Ferring

Jim Tomes and that Great Big Trophy. Photo: Mike Ferring

Jim Tomes’s boat is called Raisin Hull and that’s what he did Saturday (12/5) by snatching the giant AYC Governor’s Cup for 2015.  Jim’s speedy rating meant he started the pursuit race more than an hour after the first boat, but he finished ahead of everyone in his F18HT catamaran. See below for Jim’s account of the day.

Thirty-nine sailboats with one, two, and even three hulls took part on a day that delivered strong morning wind, light midday breeze, and before finishing nicely with a good wind in mid-afternoon.

Just like that other famous race, the America’s Cup, there is no second place in the Governor’s Cup, but credit former winner Court Roberts for finishing first among the monohulls in 4th overall.

Race organizer Tom Errickson has arranged to make the humongous race trophy even bigger by adding a two-inch solid mahogany base to make room for more winners’ names in the future.

Here’s a fun video clip shot by Brian Willess.

2015 Governor's Cup winner Jim Tomes on his F18HT catamaran.

2015 Governor’s Cup winner Jim Tomes on his F18HT catamaran.

 


From Jim Tomes:

Here is my write up of the best Governors Cup Ever! (Because I won!)

A bunch of us started off by meeting up Friday night to all hang out at the campground. We had some great sailing stories and lots of laughs of sailing days past.

The trash talk was flowing as all of us were hoping to take the cup and confidence among the sailors was greatly exaggerated around the fire. One thing we all had in common was the concern on the wind forecast. It looks to be a floater; lets all hope wind finder is wrong. We all tucked ourselves into bed and not a breeze was to be had the entire night. We woke to the same, no wind at all. Then out of nowhere the answer to our prayers was answered, WIND!! Wait, lots and lots of wind? The forecast was slow so I had no crew. My thoughts of having the light boat advantage quickly turned to: I sure hope I don’t flip.

Well the wind was holding out at the start line. We cat sailors buzzed around, zipping in and out of the monohulls as they started on their adventure leaving us at the dam on their way up the lake. Wow, a lot of those boats sure were far ahead. I was still in caution mode as the wind was blowing and I sure did not want to go over. I was getting worried as I tried to compare boat speed prior to our start. I could not keep up with those darn I20’s with boat speed. Then there was this Nacra 5.8 that I’ve never sailed against before. Those guys were blowing me away and I could not catch them. There was the P19 looking so fast and always a threat. The Hobies were now off and flying down the course. A p16 was practically out of sight before my start time approached. Fred comes booking in on the H18 a little late but then is just gone. My start is getting close, just me and those four darn I20’s left at the line. As my time approaches I hit the line moving fast and head up the lake. I have just over two minutes before the reign of I20 terror approaches.

Wow, the wind is got me a bit overpowered, so pull hard on the out-haul, max out the down-haul, under rotate, and I’m still having to pinch to keep under control. I finesse the tiller keeping my hull just above the water and am trapped out to the front cross bar to keep the bows down. Two minutes go by and I watch in horror as the freight train of 20’s rains on my parade. Within a matter of minutes after they started I was overtaken and out-sailed. Man, those guys are all fast! Now here I sit in last place overpowered and out of ideas. My visions of Governor’s Cup glory are fading fast! So I decide to not look at the other boats and focus on boat speed. My bows are down, the hull is riding at the perfect height, my tiller movements are smooth and I have a perfect line to the first island.

Almost to the north islands my spirits are reawakened, my high angle may have paid off. Brett with all wisdom decides to sail to the wrong island, Woo Hoo. I’m now one boat down. My angle seemed to have made good on Manny. Two down. But man Brad and Brian are so fast and still ahead. I round the first Island and make my way to the second. What do I do now? Wind is softer but man the spin will be a handful. Brad and Brian both have theirs up so I have no choice. I pull the chute. A little bit of crazy shifting wind by the island then I get dialed in. Single-handed trapped out with the spin is always intimidating. I’m sailing well, the wind is perfect. I’ve got the angle on Brian and I’m approaching a bunch of sailors rounding the south island. Brad, Johnathan, and Victor are all there. I pull down the spin and fight my way through the passage crowded with sailors. I decide to stay to the east, hoping that I again can make a good angle to the north islands.

Heading north I have now passed many boats and now only have Fred, two H16’s and a P16 as far as cats in front, but they are way up there! Lets see what the Lake Pleasant wind crap shoot has in store for us now. Well first let’s just turn the wind off. Not slow: off. I see everyone just kind of floating and I’m going nowhere. The boats to the north are just bobbing and the boats to the south just crawling. I can see small patches of wind in either direction but I have nothing. Then the sight I could have only hoped for: wind From the south! Good wind too!

I watch as the boats behind me fill their sails and the spinnakers come back out to play. The midday wind 180 has come! I sit waiting in anticipation and the water darkens behind me showing me that sweet wind treat. I pull out the spin and with that my grin, here it comes and I have the perfect angle. Like a switch the wind fills my sails and accelerates my boat up the lake. I’m moving now! Wait, now I’m not. I was too fast and was sailing beyond the wind line, crap. What do I do now? Let’s sail a lower angle and give me a hotter line to the island. It worked! The last group of boats are in sight coming up to the north island.

My boat is now cooking, spin out, trapped out, and I have rights as I mix it up with the rest of the fleet on a port tack. I drive through the middle of the group and have a super hot angle. I’m living up to the boat name as I get closer to the Island. Time to jibe, slide in off the trap, de-hyper-rotate, loosen the main, slide over the blocks, pull the main, re-hyper-rotate, pull the spin sheets, trap out, and set course all in one breath. The Whoop sound as the spin fills up and powers the boat to speed. Perfect line to the island and I’m passing the remaining boats. I take my last jibe and island to island line is a super hot one. Again the spin is powered up, trapped out making those oh-so-smooth figure S’s as I hold the hull just above the lake. I’m pulling away and getting a good lead on the others. My mind is now racing—I could win this!

As I douse the spin and set course up down the lake I focus on a great line and great boat speed. I look back and Brad is still within striking distance. That boat is sure fast upwind and I’m not out of the woods yet. The wind is up and I’m trapped out again all the way to the front cross bar. My arm is stretched to the max wishing my tiller was longer to keep the leeward bow deep and the windward bow above the water. I’m afraid to look back and focus forward.

I’m approaching the east side of the lake and running out of water. Time to make my tack. I slide in off the trap again, make my turn and back out on the wire. The sun is in my eye and I can’t tell where the end of the island is. Did I tack too late, do I head up or fall off a little, I can’t tell. Brad is now is now in my view as I look up the lake headed down to the last island. I still have him but he is still within striking distance.

As I get closer to the west side I can not see the island markings through the glare of the sun. I have a perfect layline! I make my last tack and head around the island. The wind is good and I’m not sure whether to run the spin or not. If I do I could be overpowered by the hot angle of the finish line, If I don’t, Brad could power up behind me and take it. I pull the chute and hope for the best. I’m pooped and feeling it in my arms. The angle is a little hot for my spin but I power through it, twice popping up a little high risking the capsize. I look back to see I am going to make it if I just don’t go over. I slide back in from the trap and ease out on the spin and sail my way over the line with Tom there to record my victory.

Holy Crap, I’ve just won!

I head back to shore to dismantle the boat and enjoy the victory with all of my great friends. I am blessed to have such great people in my life and to be able to enjoy the great sport of sailing with them. Time to cook dinner for all my friends. This time it’s gumbo! I’ve never made it before so I hope it turns out well. Thirty minutes later a huge pot, a bunch of bowls and a group of cold hungry sailors await. As Brian would say, “Winner, Winner, Gumbo Dinner!” Let’s eat. Judging from the huge, now empty pot and how many went back for seconds I think I did all right. The perfect way to close out a perfect day.

Thank you to all my friends and fellow sailors who were there to make it so special, and to those who missed it, I wish you could have been there. I hope this gives you a little feeling of what it was like on my boat and it fires you up to make it next year!

Jim Tomes on Raisin Hull

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores from week 6 of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or click here.

Lake Pleasant Fall Series Final Results

Victor Felice's J/24 on a screaming day. Photo: Victor's camera

Victor Felice’s J/24 on a screaming day. Photo: Victor’s camera

It was an experiment: A one-day weekend, a Saturday-only final weekend of the fall race series and it began with a roar. Chuck Sears said the wind touched 40 mph on his boat’s instruments. Too much for racing, and the RC put in at Scorpion Bay to wait for the wind to ease. By noon it had come down enough to bring a screaming start and by mid-afternoon the wind was delightful.

Congratulations to all who came out to play this fall and especially to the fleet champs: Charles Ellis, C22; Charles Landis, PHRF Non-Spin; Tom Baker, PHRF Spin; Tony Chapman, PHRF Sportboat; and Skip Kempff, Thistle.

The scores from Week 5 of racing at Lake Pleasant are posted on the results page, or you’ll find them by clicking here.

Tempe Town Lake Results

The wind was so light it almost couldn’t be felt, but that didn’t stop these brave sailors from facing down the calm to get in two races. Sure, they were snail sail races, but sometimes those take the most concentration—and certainly the most patience!

The scores from the Saturday Edition of racing at Tempe Town lake are posted on the results page, or you’ll find them by clicking here.

Maryellen Ferring Repeats as Ruth Beals Champ

Mike and Maryellen Ferring. Maryellen won the Ruth Beals Cup for the second year in a row.

Mike and Maryellen Ferring. Maryellen won the Ruth Beals Cup for the second year in a row.

Maryellen Ferring gets to keep the Ruth Beals trophy for another year.

The trophy goes to the winner of the annual Ruth Beals Regatta, which celebrates women in sailing. The rules permit a male as crew, but a woman has to be on the helm of the one-design Capri 14.2 boats. This year Maryellen and Mike Ferring managed to score three bullets and a second place to beat Cindy Pillote (with Wilson Davis), Kylie Jenkins (with Chad Hargrove), and Suzette and John Bush.

Many thanks to Fleet Captain Steve Brown for serving as PRO and Tony Chapman and Larry Green for helping out. At the conclusion of racing, everybody gathered on the grassy knoll for a picnic lunch provided by Chick-fil-A, punctuated with champagne and Suzette’s birthday cake.

Results:

Race 1 2 3 4 Total
Maryellen Ferring 1 1 2 1 5
Cindy Pillote 2 3 1 2 8
Suzette Bush 3 4 4 3 14
Kylie Jenkins 5 DNS 3 4 14

The skippers: Cindy Pillote, Kylie Jenkins, Maryellen Ferring, Suzette Bush

The skippers: Cindy Pillote, Kylie Jenkins, Maryellen Ferring, Suzette Bush

Captains and crew: Wilson Davis, Cindy Pillote, Chad Hargrove, Kylie Jenkins, Maryellen Ferring, Mike Ferring, Suzette Bush, John Bush

Captains and crew: Wilson Davis, Cindy Pillote, Chad Hargrove, Kylie Jenkins, Maryellen Ferring, Mike Ferring, Suzette Bush, John Bush

Mike sets the whisker pole for Maryellen at the Ruth Beals Cup Regatta. Photo: Bill Cunningham

Mike sets the whisker pole for Maryellen at the Ruth Beals Cup Regatta. Photo: Bill Cunningham

Lake Pleasant Results

A beautiful weekend on the lake for November 7-8, with a challenging mix of big wind, dying wind, and wildly shifting wind. On Saturday, racing was late starting as the Whaler went on a rescue mission to help a turtled Hobie, but there was still wind remaining to send us all out for a nice afternoon. Sunday morning we had just two hard-core fleets, the PHRF spins and sportboats, plus a morning gaggle of fast-flying multi-hulls. The wind passed quickly (and painfully) through the shifting phase and came back long enough to run another couple races.

The scores for week 4 of racing at Lake Pleasant are posted on the results page, or you’ll find them by clicking here.

PHRF Spin fleet leader Tom Baker.

PHRF Spin fleet leader Tom Baker. Photo: Chris Smith

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores for the very light wind week 4 of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or you’ll find them by clicking here.

Register for 2015 Governor’s Cup Regatta

Registration is open for the Governor’s Cup long distance race, scheduled for Saturday, December 5. The entry and race courses are now posted here.

There’s just a $10 fee for entry. Then, it’s a day sail across Lake Pleasant—a feat accomplished by zig-zagging from end to end and back again. Here’s the one-page Notice of Race and Sailing Instructions. You’re invited for appetizers served at the Pleasant Harbor Marina restaurant after you finish.

While it’s a race, it’s also just a nice day on the water that could extend into the evening in light air (but hasn’t gone that long before).

The winner of the race gets his or her name engraved on that gigantic trophy and gets to show it off for the next year. The rest of us get a nice day zig-zagging.

This is a pursuit race, which means boats will start at different times based on their PHRF ratings, with the slowest boats leaving first and the fastest leaving last. The winner will be the first boat to complete the course and cross the finish. Because of difficulty in matching monohull boats and multi-hull boats, this year the two types will race separately and the multi-hulls will receive a separate perpetual trophy.

Yeah! Brett and Crew Johnston won the Governor's Cup in 2014 and got to keep it for a year.

Yeah! Brett and Crew Johnston won the Governor’s Cup in 2014 and got to keep it for a year.

 

Tempe Town Lake Scheduled to Close for More than a Month Next Spring

Replacing the current inflated rubber Tempe Town Lake dam with concrete and steel will shut down the lake—probably next spring—for a period the city estimates will be more than one month, severely affecting activities for Arizona Yacht Club and the Arizona Sailing Foundation.

Tempe Senior Boating Coordinator Alicia Jerger announced the plan in an email, saying the new concrete and steel dam will be finished in “February or March,” depending on weather delays. At that point the city will divert the TTL water and, she says, “It is anticipated that refilling of Town Lake, mostly using water exchange credits, will begin one month after the water is diverted. Tempe Town Lake will be closed to boating and water recreation once the water diverting has begun.”

The new steel gate dam system  includes 8 gates that will be hydraulically controlled to open for flood control. Here’s a link to the Tempe web page that includes videos describing the new system.

Obviously closing the lake will throw the AYC and ASF schedules into chaos, especially since it’s not possible to plan much in advance for the closure.

A frame of the City of Tempe's video showing a simulation of the dam in operation.

A frame of the City of Tempe’s video showing a simulation of the dam in operation.

Lake Pleasant Results

Scores for week 3 of racing at Lake Pleasant are posted on the results page, or are available by clicking here.

Lake Pleasant Week 2 Results

One of our typical Lake Pleasant sailing weekends: some really nice wind, some drifting, some waiting for the wind to shift from one to the other.

The scores for this weekend of racing at Lake Pleasant are posted on the results page, or you can find them by clicking here.

Aboard Melissa Kay downwind in the Sportboat fleet.

Aboard Melissa Kay downwind in the Sportboat fleet.

Tempe Town Lake Results

It was a wild Sunday afternoon on Tempe Town Lake (10/4), with the wind varying between zero and 30, which can be just a little bit challenging when you’re racing a small sailboat. Ask the people who went swimming! The wind was (often) from the south side of the lake, where the new wind blockers (aka office buildings) wreak havoc, with bright streaks of wind ripping through the slots between the buildings while the rest of the lake lies quiet.

The scores for this second week of racing on Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or they’re available by clicking here.

TTL-Race-Results-Graphic-4-13

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores for the first week of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the Results page, or you’ll find them by clicking here.

Successful Sailboat Racing Seminars

Martin Lorch on the panel of Club Champions. Photos: Mike Ferring

Martin Lorch on the panel of Club Champions. Photos: Mike Ferring

We had an excellent turnout for two racing seminars leading up to the start of the fall 2015 season, with 16 in an Introduction class and some 35 at the Advanced Sailboat Racing seminar.

The Advanced seminar was led by three AYC Club Champions, Skip Kempff, Martin Lorch and Dave Haggart, focusing on starts, wind, and tactics. Skip has long practiced the Vanderbilt start, using timed runs away from the start line in order to hit the line at speed on time, and he advocated that method for people new to the game. Martin offered a couple pages of wind tips to be ready for the shifty wind on our lakes. And Dave offered some tricks for herding your competitors in the direction you want them to go.

The sailors ranged in experience from beginners to champions, fueling a discussion that continued even after the meeting adjourned. Most of the beginners had been in the room the night before when Mike and Maryellen Ferring offered a fast course in fast racing, presenting an introduction to the sport that included documents, rules, race courses, start sequence, start tactics, wind shifts and more.

Now it’s time to take it all to the water.

Some 35 sailors gathered to hear advanced sailing tips and exchange ideas.

Some 35 sailors gathered to hear advanced sailing tips and exchange ideas.

Haggarts Snag Third at C14 Nationals

AYC’s Dave and Stacey Haggart finished a strong third in the Capri 14.2 Nationals held the weekend of July 11-12 at Mission Bay Yacht Club in San Diego. Martin and Cedric Lorch took fifth in the regatta.

Perhaps the biggest surprise is that perennial champion Scott Finkboner had a couple weak (for him) races and finished a lowly second. Complete results available here.

A start during the 2015 C14 Nationals at Mission Bay Yacht Club.

A start during the 2015 C14 Nationals at Mission Bay Yacht Club. That’s Martin and Cedric Lorch closest to the camera.

Haggarts Dominate 2015 Championship Race

Dave and Stacey Haggart clobbered AYC’s other fleet champs. Annihilated them. Stomped ’em. Humbled ’em. Sound like an exaggeration? Consider this: Five races, five firsts. At that point Martin Lorch waved the white flag even though he still had a mathematical chance to win. Game over.

It was only in the first race that Haggarts were challenged, working their way through the fleet and solidifying first place with a perfect tack on Skip Kempff, drenching him with bad air.

The 2015 AYC Club Championship Regatta was played out at Tempe Town Lake in Capri 14.2s, starting with light wind and ending with a brisk breeze. On the water were sailors with a combined 15 championships—Skip Kempff, 7; Martin Lorch, 6; Mike Hester (crewing for Will Zornik), 2. And spectating, 10-time champ Don Hubele. Champs, make room for Dave Haggart.

Here are the scores.

Skipper R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 Total
Dave Haggart 1 1 1 1 1 5
Martin Lorch 4 4 3 2 2 15
Skip Kempff 2 2 6 4 3 17
Will Zornik 5 3 2 5 4 19
Matt Davis 3 5 5 3 6 22
Mike Baros 6 6 4 6 5 27
Paul Liszewski 7 7 7 7 DNS (8) 36


Steve Brown was the event organizer; Mike Ferring the PRO. Other committee members were John Mayall, Kathleen Roxlo, and Jordan Brown. A number of others helped out with boat exchanges.

Members of the 14.2 fleet who loaned their boats for the regatta were Ferrings, Haggarts, Bill Hutchinson, Martin Lorch, John Mayall, and George Tingom. ASF also loaned a boat.

Dave and Stacey Haggart demonstrate their dominance, leading the mob home. Photos: Mike Ferring

Dave and Stacey Haggart demonstrate their dominance, leading the mob home. Photos: Mike Ferring

The wind came up nicely in the afternoon, pushing competitors to full-hike.

The wind came up nicely in the afternoon, pushing competitors to full-hike.

Paul Liszewski flips Ferrings' boat at the windward mark. (Click for bigger size)

Paul Liszewski flips Ferrings’ boat at the windward mark. (Click for bigger size)

Competitors took a midday break for lunch.

Competitors took a midday break for lunch.

A young Mr. Riddell thinks there's nothing quite like some watermelon with your sailboat race.

Tate Riddell thinks there’s nothing quite like some watermelon with your sailboat race.