Racing Updates RSS feed for this section

Light Wind Birthday Regatta

Awards at the The scourge of any sailing regatta: light wind. Give us wind and pretty much everything else takes care of itself, right?

This year the Birthday Regatta & Leukemia Cup was a light wind wonder. But you had fun anyway, right?

Here are the results.

Here are shots of the awards presentations. Photos by Chris Smith.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Sign Up for Spring Racing

Ready to get back to racing? Tempe Town Lake sailors go after each other beginning Sunday, January 25, at 2 pm. Lake Pleasant opens for action two weeks later on Saturday, February 7, at 12:30 pm.

Sign Up Now

The Gibbs family on their last boat (since replaced by a Catalina 25).

The Gibbs family on their Santana (since replaced by a Catalina 25).

You’ll find all the race documents on the racing page.

The TransLoch Series again is part of the Lake Pleasant action, an opportunity for sailors who like long-distance runs rather than races around the buoys (and it’s a great way to start for people new to the sport).

Otherwise, AYC veterans know the drill: fun on the water. Lasers, Capri 14.2, Buccaneer 18 and Portsmouth boats go at it on TTL. Catalina 22, Santana 20, Thistle, PHRF Non-Spin, Spin, and Sportboat race at Lake Pleasant.

Next Event: 2015 Birthday Regatta

Registration is now closed. 

Here comes the biggest event of the AYC year. Sign up now for the 2015 Birthday Regatta, played Friday-Sunday, January 16-18. Here’s more information on the registration page.

Regatta organizer Cindy Pillote says expect the event to be run a lot like the last two years, with the Saturday night dinner at the Pleasant Harbor Marina Waterfront Grill.

Checking out the scores during the 2014 Birthday Regatta. Photo: Peter Howson.

Checking out the scores during the 2014 Birthday Regatta. Photo: Peter Howson.

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores for the final week of racing for the Fall Series at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the Results page, or by clicking here.

Tempe Town Lake Results

Week 7 scores at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the Results page, or by clicking here.

Tempe Town Lake Results

Another week playing hide and seek with the breeze at Tempe Town Lake. The scores for week 6 are posted on the results page, or by clicking here.

Lasers cluster for close racing at Tempe Town Lake as a flock of cranes watch. Photo: Mike Ferring

Lasers cluster for close racing at Tempe Town Lake as a flock of cranes watches. Photo: Mike Ferring

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores from week 5 of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or by clicking here. A whacky race day, even by TTL standards, with no wind, then lots of wind, then wind to the left, then right…

Lake Pleasant Results

It was a fine, windy Saturday followed by a blustery, nutty Sunday−only a half dozen boats showing up to face the heavy wind. Brian Willess decided to come out and offered thanks to the safety boat crew, saying, “They did a great job helping us get the Selina Kyle NACRA 6.0 catamaran pointy side up again. All the guys worked very hard when helping us. Please pass on our gratitude.”

Watch Victor Felice’s entertaining 8 minute video.

Let’s also congratulate the winners: Mike Baros, C22; George Tingom Saturday-only C22; Charles Landis, PHRF Non-Spin; Paul Liszewski, PHRF Spin; Martin Lorch, Santana 20; Court Roberts, PHRF Sportboat; Mike Hester, Thistle (on a tie-breaker over Skip Kempff); Steve Dolter, TransLoch.

The final week of Fall racing at Lake Pleasant  are posted on the results page, or by clicking here.

Victor Felice and his brave crew in nutty-windy. Photo: Victor's brave stern pulpit camera.

Victor Felice and his brave crew in nutty-windy. Photo: Victor’s brave stern pulpit camera.

 

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores from a light wind weekend at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or by clicking here.

Beals Champ: Maryellen Ferring

Maryellen Ferring with crew Mike Ferring holding the trophy for winning the 2014 Ruth Beals Regatta. Photo: Victor Felice

Maryellen Ferring with crew Mike Ferring holding the trophy for winning the 2014 Ruth Beals Regatta. Photo: Victor Felice

Maryellen Ferring hefted the Ruth Beals Trophy Saturday (11/8), winning the 10th annual race for women at the helm. The race is named for AYC’s founder.

Maryellen and crew Mike Ferring took the win with two first place and one second place finishes in light air at Tempe Town Lake. Last year’s winner, Cindy Pillote, finished second with crew Wilson Davis. Suzette Bush was third with two different crew. All competitors sailed Capri 14.2s.

Thanks to AYC Fleet Captain Steve Brown for heading the race committee and RC workers Bob Whyte and Victor Felice.

Maryellen and Mike look back to make sure they're not gaining! Photo: Dennis Davis

Maryellen and Mike look back to make sure they’re not gaining! Photo: Dennis Davis

 

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores for week 3 of racing on Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or by clicking here.

AYC Part of Guinness World Record

Bart's-Completion-CertificateThe final results are now in and we not only broke the Guinness World Record for most boats participating in a regatta, we crushed it. Worldwide that day, 16,870 boats participated, sailing a distance roughly equivalent to twice around the world. Arizona Yacht Club was one of more than 500 clubs participating. Bart’s Bash also raised more than $400,000 for the Andrew Simpson Sailing Foundation, which helps kids learn to sail.

We actually got 34 boats to the starting line for Bart’s Bash, named for Andrew “Bart” Simpson, who died during practice for the America’s Cup last year.

Were you there? Download the certificate on the right.

You’ll find the Bart’s Bash results here. After much research, I’ve figured out that the “speed” number you’ll see is meters/second multiplied by a “Bart’s Number,” a handicap number that bears little resemblance to anything else you’ll see anywhere else (but clearly penalizes multi-hulls). Click on an entrant’s name to see the detail. I’ve submitted all the required documentation so that now AYC will be part of the Guinness World Record for largest regatta. Many thanks to the 31 finishing boats and AYC race committee that made it happen!

Boats mill around the start line on Saturday (9/20). Some 34 boats ran the race for the Guinness World Record. Photo: Victor Felice

Boats mill around the start line on Saturday (9/20). Some 34 boats ran the race for the Guinness World Record. Photo: Victor Felice

Victor Felice helped organize the AYC Bash and shot the needed pictures and video. Candis and Jeff Middlebrook acted as the required witnesses. Victor and Mike Ferring struggled through the lengthy and complex Bart’s Bash and Guinness requirements. Dave Christensen thrashed through the scoring.

Mostly it was the crews and captains of 34 boats who made it happen.

 

 

Lake Pleasant Results Week 3

A weekend of contrasts: No wind Saturday. LOTS of it on Sunday. After optimistically drifting for a couple hours or so on Saturday, the race committee sent everybody off on a short dawdle that they then cut short. Sunday? Wow, was that fun! Strong northerly wind held until about noon, letting most fleets get in four races and some wild ones: boats over, boats planing at high speed−a rash of crazy fun.

The scores for week 3 of racing at Lake Pleasant are posted on the results page, or by clicking here.

That's Greg Jackson and crew knocked down and dragging the spinnaker during a Sunday puff at Lake Pleasant. Photo: Mike Ferring's rail-mounted GoPro

That’s Greg Jackson and crew knocked down and dragging the spinnaker during a Sunday puff at Lake Pleasant. Photo: Mike Ferring’s rail-mounted GoPro

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores for the second weekend of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page, or you’ll find them by clicking here.

Pleasant Week Two on Lake Pleasant

A pleasant weekend on Lake Pleasant, a light air weekend but with fiercely-fought battles in every fleet. Here are the scores.

Thanks to the Catalina 22 fleet for work on race committee and for the secret recipe baked beans.

During one race, Victor Felice (J/24 Mermaid Rescue) had a bumpy encounter with the submerged island near the south mark—and since he thinks it would be neat to win the Blunder Bucket, consented to share his onboard video with you. As he explains it, he’s anxious to be publicly humiliated and, sure, he thinks others might learn something from it. Anyway, here’s his expletive expurgated video. Thanks, Victor, and good luck with the Blunder Vote in December!

Santana 20s downwind. Photo: Mike Ferring

Santana 20s downwind. Photo: Mike Ferring

Tempe Town Lake Results

The scores for the first week of racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the results page or by clicking here.

Tempe Town Lake Action is Next

Now that we’ve had Opening Day at Lake Pleasant, it’s time to gear up for Tempe Town Lake!

The competition looks typically stiff in the Capri 14.2 and Laser fleets, but the Buccaneer 18 fleet needs to gather some steam after a few years of diminishing numbers. You can retrieve all the needed documents and register to race in the series on the racing page.

Racing and race committee training will begin at 3pm on Sunday (9/28) and will extend through the fall, with the final races Sunday, December 18. Because of earlier sunset, the November and December races will begin at 2pm.

More wind needs more weight on the rail. Ferrings with three crew on a windy Sunday. Photo: Colleen Jimenez

More wind needs more weight on the rail. Ferrings with three crew on a windy Sunday. Photo: Colleen Jimenez

 

Light Wind Opens Lake Pleasant Fall Season

For a while Saturday (9/20), it looked as if we might not get enough wind to race, but the wind finally arrived, the season opened with a bang (see below), and we were off and running. Sunday the wind was nice for the Bart’s Bash race, then held for one decent race, and then went into hiding for the rest of the day, sending everyone home early.

The results from the season opener are posted on the results page or you’ll find them by clicking here.

Preliminary results from Bart’s Bash are here.

Start of a Sportboat race. Photo: Victor Felice

Start of the Sportboat race. Photo: Victor Felice

Jumping on the Riddell Crazy Train

The view of oncoming spin-flying boats was so pretty the crew applauded. Photos: Mike Ferring

The view of oncoming spin-flying boats was so pretty the crew applauded. Photos: Mike Ferring

Here’s a prescription for sailing chaos: Take a dozen men who barely know each other, throw them in a frat-house hot-house, mix in gallons of beer and vodka, drop them on a 37-foot boat that most of them have never sailed, on a race course that’s a complete mystery to them, outlaw speed and nav instruments, give them 45 minutes to practice, and put them up against 10 well-drilled, well-honed competitors.

Oh, and just to make things interesting, make most of the dozen captains of their own boats with their own ideas of speed and tactics. And as an icebreaker, one of them greets another one by announcing, “I don’t like you and I don’t know how I can sail with you.”

So, how did it come out?

Not bad, actually.

John Riddell conducting the AYC symphony.

John Riddell conducting the AYC symphony.

None of this is made up and some of it you’d never believe anyway, but for the third year AYC membership director John Riddell patched together a crew of guys from the club with the express goal of their getting to know each other, of mingling experience with inexperience—heading off to have fun while trying not to make fools of themselves in front of the best of the West Coast sailing glitterati. First year’s results: last. Second year: next to last. Third year: third from last. At this rate, it’s victory in 2022!

The venue is the Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week, a very well organized and run regatta that this year drew 142 boats, including a couple TP52s and boats that are even bigger. Tony Chapman told me before the regatta that he thinks it’s the best on the coast and he’s been going for years. In fact, all the AYC Vipers were there to compete. And Chris Smith towed his J/80 for this event and another race that sails to Catalina. In all, there were probably over 30 AYC people racing on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

We all gathered Thursday in a very nice rented house not far from Long Beach Yacht Club and a short walk to the clatter of 2nd Avenue’s row of restaurants and shops. I never got an exact count, but there were at least 15 men sharing this four bedroom, 2½ bath house. What they did at night is the stuff of next-day legend, but what happens in Long Beach, you know, stays there. Animal House didn’t have much on this bunch of much-older-than-thats.

Some of the raucous pick-up crew of Crazy Train.

Some of the raucous pick-up crew of Crazy Train.

So we gathered in a meeting where John Riddell cracked jokes and made it clear that he was pretty sure he knew what he was doing on big boats and he expected us to follow instructions and no backtalk. He said in the past he had a habit of shouting instructions (and other words) from the back of the boat to the front of the boat and this year he damn well wasn’t going to do that (a vow he broke constantly all three days). Everybody talked; some listened. It was very loud.

I woke up at 6-something Friday morning to the smell of frying bacon and sausage. Peter Lehrach would stand in front of the frying pans for a couple hours each morning stacking eggs and bacon for the gathering mob. Thanks, Peter. And then Adam “The Badger” Torel would mass-assemble a countertop of sandwiches to bag for lunch. Adam was John’s able organizer off the water.

Identical Catalina 37s were our Crazy Train.

Identical Catalina 37s were our Crazy Train.

The 11 racing boats lined up stern-to in slips in front of Long Beach Yacht Club, each boat rented from the club for the regatta. They’re 1990 Catalina 37s, built for the Congressional Cup match racing regatta that was already famous when Frank Butler custom built these 11-of-a-kind boats that have been used for that prestigious event ever since. They’re maintained perfectly. This weekend they had crispy new sails.

You’ll see in the picture that our team was outfitted in new team shirts, another Riddell LBRW tradition. We were the “Crazy Train,” a name that fit comfortably. Other teams were also wearing team shirts and moving around the boats with a studied familiarity. A couple teams sail these boats nearly every week. Others sail as a team on other kinds of boats. They all knew what they were doing.

In matching team shirts, the Crazy Train gets ready to set sail.

In matching team shirts, the Crazy Train gets ready to set sail.

With all of 45 minutes permitted before the first gun, we had enough time to figure out pretty much what everybody should sorta do. Fortunately, helmsman Trey Harlow had drafted his friend JB to handle the front of the boat, so the front and the back were in good hands. The middle? Some work needed. Some position-swapping. Some encouragement from John.

The boat is big and heavy and slow to respond and likes to keep moving, gathering speed slowly out of tacks. That’s about all we knew when the first gun sounded and we approached the much-too-short start line. Late. John said he wasn’t ready to mix it up with the fast guys this early, especially after last year, but we won’t talk about that.

Tenth. Out of 11. Race and repeat. Ninth. Not so bad when you consider the size of the hill we had to climb. I was assigned the job of standing at the back of the boat trying to look useful—something I’m pretty good at faking. Not a bad gig, really, with a nice view. But main trimmer Jason Donkersley aggravated a back injury and was carted off to the ER and suddenly I had a new job Saturday: main trimmer. Cool. The view’s not as nice, craning your neck to watch the trim and judging whether the top batten tell tale is stalling 50% of the time as John prescribed or 35% of the time, which he knew wasn’t enough, or not at all, which I darn well knew was the right way (as one of the many “captains” trimming on this boat).

Thistle Maestro Trey Harlow at the helm.

Thistle Maestro Trey Harlow at the helm.

And BANG. Saturday’s first race saw us on the starting line at speed and actually freaking leading at the windward mark and only giving back two places to finish THIRD! “See we know how to sail this boat!” John shouted across the water to no one in particular.

Hubris, of course. The next race we went this way and the wind went that way and we were gargling salt water in last place. Last. The pain was palpable. We recovered for a 9th in the third race of the day and went into Saturday night clinging to 9th overall by one point and staring at a 7-point gap to 8th. On Sunday we scored an 8th and a finale fifth and left the race course feeling very good about the distance we’d come.

Chris Reinhardt spin trims as the afterguard works the boat downwind.

Chris Reinhardt spin trims as the afterguard works the boat downwind.

Los Alamitos Yacht Club and Long Beach Yacht Club offered up noisy, liquid parties each night and we got a chance to compare our day with the Viper guys and hear about that mark rounding where Chris Smith was supposed to leave it to starboard and a boat three times his size was supposed to round to port and, wow, it all came out all right. And the expensive Velocitek? Kicked overboard. Fortunes of war.

As we scattered for the airport or a highway dash across the desert, I think everyone was savoring a weekend well spent. I know I was. The weather was gorgeous. The boats and races were fun. Fifteen or so guys in a house worked better than I ever thought it would. Thank you, John Riddell, you crazy SOB, for driving this insane experiment.

Rob Gibbs wind sprints the spin halyard.

Rob Gibbs wind sprints the halyard.

New member and veteran sailor Scott Burkhardt gets into the racing thing.

New member and veteran sailor Scott Burkhardt gets into the racing thing.

Nailing the start.

Nailing the start.

Commodore Peter Lehrach kept the pit cooking. And breakfast.

Commodore Peter Lehrach kept the pit cooking. And breakfast.

Hike hard. Adam Torel and Josh McClain.

Hike hard. Adam Torel and Josh McClain.

Here’s a video that Rob Gibbs put together of the event (using some of these pictures).

AYC Turns Out in Force for Long Beach Race Week

The dozen members of the Crazy Train pick-up team organized by John Riddell.

The dozen members of the Crazy Train pick-up team organized by John Riddell.

First there are the sailors of the Viper fleet. All of them headed for Long Beach June 27-29 for the Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week. And then there were the misfits of the Crazy Train, a dozen guys thrown together to sail a Catalina 37. And Chris Smith and his team on his J/80 sailing the longer “random leg” course. A couple dozen or so AYC people altogether.

How did it go? Far as I could tell, everybody was having a good time with slightly lighter than usual wind, lots of sun, and temperatures in the 70s. Yes, 70s. Why would this not be good? And the LBRW was a very well organized event with 142 entries sailing over three days.

Court Roberts edged Tony Chapman for local honors in the 23-boat Viper fleet, finishing 10 and 11. Chris Smith grabbed fifth in his segment of the random leg. And the misfits? More on this later, but they were feeling pretty good with a 9th out of a 11 given the size of the challenge.

The Catalina 37 starts were challenging on a short line and 11 big boats. Photos: Mike Ferring

The Catalina 37 starts were challenging on a short line and 11 big boats. Photos: Mike Ferring

Heading downwind at Long Beach Race Week. The Crazy Train team hustles.

Heading downwind at Long Beach Race Week. The Crazy Train team hustles.