Archive | June, 2019

AYC at Long Beach Race Week!

Team Cactus League Helmsman Joel Hurley on the Port Tack Layline

It was a little like a mini-meeting of AYC at Long Beach Race Week this year.

The AYC boats that participated were:

  • Tony Chapman’s Viper 640 Little Wing
  • Mike Hester’s Viper 640 Nectar Sled
  • Mike Grijalva’s Newport 41 Shockwave in the PHRF Random Leg Fleet
  • Paul Liszewski’s Hobie 33 Rolling in the Deep in the PHRF Random Leg Fleet
  • Rob Gibbs’s Catalina 37 Team Cactus League

Conditions were light on Friday but by the Summer Solstice picked up dramatically. Afternoon winds Saturday and Sunday topped 20kts and even the big heavy C37s looked fast! The Vipers spent the whole weekend on the Ocean courses while the C37s whizzed around the marks behind the breakwater.

It takes 8-10 to crew the Catalina 37, and nine of Team Cactus League were from AYC. The team this year was Helmsman Joel Hurley, Main Trimmer Dave Rawstrom, Lead Trimmer Josh McClain, Trimmer David Newland, Grinder Matt Baker, Grinder Toby Ambrose, Pit Master Grant Younger, Mast Princess Heather McClain, and Bowman Rob Gibbs. Our local knowledge expert and coach from the Long Beach area was Matt Rustigan. There were shore crew as well…Kim OlsonGibbs, Andi Baker, and Kaitlin Bowen managed “on shore operations” for the team.

Paul Liszewski and crew.

Vipers crew with at least three and Mike Hester sailed with his daughter Sarah and John Mayall. Tony sailed with Amerson Woods and Glenn Van Hell from the Long Beach area. Unfortunately Tony had damage to his mast track and was not able to race on Sunday.

In the Random Leg Fleet, Rolling in the Deep had Owner Paul Liszewski at the helm and Arizona crew Sean Brown and Bre (owners of the Olson 25 Stargazer) along with Keena, Tyler, and Ann from the Long Beach area. Shockwave‘s crew consisted of Mike Grijalva and his wife Jo, Frank Grijalva, Ricky Gilchrist, Jim Brock and Kevin Edwards.

Everyone left tired and looking forward to next year – June 26–28, 2020. Make your plans now! Let’s add to the number of AZ boats that show up to this WORLD CLASS event!

Like to Play Host to an AYC Happy Hour?

By Heather McClain, Cruising Captain

AYC Volunteers needed—Easiest and most fun volunteer gig EVER!

AYC has been holding monthly Happy Hour gatherings (or “Dog Watch”) at various bars and restaurants around the Valley, either on Tuesday or Thursday from about 5:30p to, well, until people leave. The Dogs have been in different areas and different days to make it easy for members and nonmembers to find one they can attend nearby. The attendance varies from a handful to 20+.

So, how would you like to host one?

Here’s what you need to do:

  • Select one of the available dates for the Happy Hour you’ll host (see below).
  • Pick your favorite local bar/restaurant.
  • Show up at the right place and the right time, and buy up to $100 of appetizers (not beverages/alcohol) for AYC members and potential AYC members who attend.
  • Collect the contact info of the potential AYC members at happy hour (name, email, phone number).
  • Submit by email the contact info to Heather McClain and the receipt for reimbursement to Treasurer Tony Chapman.

Interested? Here are the available dates:

Thurs 8/22/19, Thurs 10/24/19, Tues 1/28/20, Thurs 2/27/20, Tues 3/24/20, Thurs 4/23/20, Tues 5/26/20, Thurs 6/25/20.

You want to host a Happy Hour but don’t know when? Contact me! We’ll work it out.

Happy Hour at 4 Peaks Brewing in Tempe.

New Home for our Membership Meetings!

At the last meeting, the current management at Rolling Hills Golf Course asked us (and the LPSC) to remove our trophies and trophy cases and to remove our gear from their storage area. If you were there you noticed that there was a Golf League event scheduled at the same time as our meeting. They are making changes that will help them succeed as a Golf Venue and of course we want them to succeed!

But what is best for Rolling Hills isn’t necessarily the best for the AYC. The board has come to the decision that it is time to part ways with Rolling Hills. We wish them the best, but we feel there are other options that will better fit our needs.

I’m pleased to announce that we’ve been working with R.T. O’Sullivans at the corner of Hayden and Thomas to have our meetings there.

Why did we choose this location?

  • Not far from our current location.
  • Easy access to the highway.
  • A great, affordable Regular Menu.
  • Amazing specials (Tuesday’s are 2 for 1 Burgers!)
  • Flexible space that allows us to have our regular meetings or scale up to large meetings when we need it.
  • An in house AV System that allows us to mitigate noise issues and easily have speakers and presentations.
  • Plenty of parking.
  • The management and staff are really friendly and glad to have us there.

We are holding our next “Dog Watch” Happy Hour there on Thursday the 27th of June starting around 5:30 pm as they always do going until whenever! (The kitchen closes at Midnight and they kick everyone out at 2 am!) We hope you come out and check it out!

Our next General Membership Meeting is on Tuesday the 9th of July and will be held at this new location.

We will be soliciting feedback via email survey from all members about their experience in order to work with RT O’Sullivan’s management to make this a great change for us.

Your feedback will determine if we stay or if we go, so please come out and support Your Arizona Yacht Club as we make this very important change.

THANKS

Rob Gibbs
Commodore
Arizona Yacht Club

Catalina Flotilla – 19 July

Avalon Harbor

The Second Annual Officially Unofficial Flotilla to Catalina Island will be July 19th this year. Last year we had some great fun meeting up with some of the more traveled of our membership in Descanso Bay before being given a great spot in Avalon Harbor. Some of the best wind I’ve EVER had going to and from Catalina to Long Beach.

The closest location to depart from is Long Beach but the other options that are a single day would be Marina Del Rae, Huntington Beach, or even Dana Point. For those more adventurous, the trip from San Diego is an overnight sail. You can trailer your boat over and launch in several different locations in any of those harbors, but if you are so inclined to charter, there are several different places to charter from but here are some of the more popular and known ones: Marina Sailing, Harbor Yacht Club, and Sail Newport Beach.

For those who haven’t ever taken to the ocean, the sail to Catalina Island is a GREAT way to get a feel for what it’s like to sail in open water. It is truly one of the easiest sails to begin your blue water sailing resume with. For those who are blue water veterans, it is a great weekend getaway from the Arizona heat and a welcome return to friendly waters.

A flotilla is a very loose thing…so if you are going to be on the island for any reason during that time you should let us know! If you are sailing over, we can look out for one another and schedule a call in to ensure everyone is all good.

If you think you are going or if you might go but would like more information please take a moment to fill our this form and we’ll get all your questions answered!

Sorry. This form is no longer available.

Avalon, Catalina Island, California

 

Sailing Made to Scale

Here’s a problem we don’t often have on full-size boats. Photo: Mike Ferring

Is a Mallard on starboard an obstruction? Good thing the ducks on Estrella South Lake know how to paddle out of the way of fast-closing serious racers, close-hauled and chasing toward the windward mark.

The wind was light on this Saturday morning when a dozen SeaWind radio-controlled boats lined up for the start at a regatta presented by the West Valley R/C Mariners. In spite of the light stuff, the boats moved quite well on a w/l course roughly 40 yards long.

Multi-time AYC Club Champion Al Lehman Jr. is a recent convert to RC racing. Surprise: he’s good at it. Photo: Mike Ferring

On the shore, the dozen sailors and a couple race officers shuffled to keep pace with the boats and expertly trim sails and steer from a distance—a job made especially difficult with shifting wisps of breeze. No one spoke (or shouted at his crew). It felt like a tense championship tennis match.

Four of those sailors were AYC members: Al Lehman and Al Junior, Dave Nowak, and Dean Johnson (who recently joined AYC and races an Andrews Governor’s Cup 21 in PHRF Spin).

Dean says he’s been RC racing a decade or more and he’s an RC winner. Al Jr told us he picked up the hobby about 1½ years ago and loves it. As you probably know, Al is a champion sailor in full-size boats and has adapted quickly to RC. He said he finished third in the national championships in Sacramento last year.

Al and Al Jr are attracted to how easy it is to go sailing with RC: it’s cheap, takes no time to rig, and you can sail in the nearest pond. “Under $100 for sails,” Al Jr smiles. Try that with your big boat.

They explain that the one-meter SeaWind is just one of a number of RC boats being raced and point to the DragonFlite 95 as an easy-entry, up-and-coming class. Here’s more.

At the end of the day, Al Jr had won the regatta with Dean Johnson in second.

Jed Korthals reported to the racers that, “In race ten the windward mark mysteriously moved closer to the offset mark. It turns out that a fairly large turtle, with its foot caught on a fish hook and line, had entangled the windward mark. We were able to reel it in, free the turtle from its trapped leg, and reset the mark. Everyone, especially the turtle, seemed happy.”

Photos by Mike Ferring:

Wednesday Beer Can Racing

Wednesday night organizer George Sheller. Photo: Mike FerringWhat are you doing Wednesday night? How about coming out for some highly casual racing at Tempe Town Lake?

We start racing at 5:30 and go until sundown. We do a one minute start sequence. One turn penalty. Short w/l courses.

This started as a Laser thing, but others started coming out, which was great. We all start together.

This is not an official AYC event, so you’re on your own in terms of a boat, liability and fun. We start promptly at 5:30 pm and if you miss one or two races it’s no big deal since we don’t keep scores. This is good practice, with bragging rights and then (for those who want to) off to a local restaurant for dinner and drinks.

Have questions?  Email me.

See you out there,
George Sheller

What the Board Does with YOUR Money

Club Treasurer – Tony Chapman

Our club’s finances are not super complicated, but I wanted to take a moment to explain the “model” we are using. Every club operates a little differently, depending on what resources it has to offer and what their leadership feels is necessary to operate the club. As a member, you have a right to know how your money is spent and what we are doing to ensure that the club is financially sound.

Our club is a “Pay for what you use” club. That allows us to keep our annual dues very low, but it also means that every program or event attempts to pay for itself. There are a few exceptions to this but overall that is the goal. Here are some of the programs and their expenses:

The Race Series Program – This encompasses the racing at Tempe Town Lake, Lake Pleasant, as well as the Governor’s Cup, Ruth Bealls Cup, and the Tall Cactus. These programs have to pay for the lake user fees, fuel expenses, maintenance and upkeep on club equipment, and any expenses like food at social events that might be provided in conjunction with a race.

Birthday Regatta – This is such a big event, that we track it separately. In addition to Lake User Fees and fuel expenses, there are all kinds of other expenses, like catering, speaker fees, facility rental (think Big Tent), and other things that might change from year to year depending on the program. This event is the one that has the biggest potential to impact the club budget if something goes sideways, so we get updates from the Regatta Chairman in the months leading up to the event.

Commodore’s Party – This is one of the exceptions to the “pay for itself” rule. We don’t have a facility to host our own celebration, which adds to the cost of this event (as well as others). The AYC Boards over the years have set a precedent that, in order to keep the price of the ticket reasonable, we would subsidize the cost of the Commodore’s Party. This year there were three options and the venue and budget were voted on and approved by the board.

So where do your annual dues go? These revenues are spent on speakers and general membership meeting expenses, hosting the “Dog Watch” Happy Hours, printing the roster and membership cards, club insurance and membership dues in the Yachting Club of America and the Southern California Yachting Association, burgees that we give to our members, as well as making up any shortfalls in any of the programs when the don’t come up in the black. Any surplus goes into savings for major capital investments. The two largest in recent memory being “The Barge” pontoon boat and the “Wicked Awesome” Whaler.

And that is how it works. No smoke and mirrors, just making every attempt to use club funds to create the best sailing opportunities in the region and provide the most value to our members. Our long-time Treasurer Tony Chapman will be giving a short overview with actual numbers at the September Monthly Meeting so come out and discuss it with us!

Help ASF with Each Amazon Purchase

Do you shop at Amazon? The huge online merchant will give .5% (one-half percent) of the money from each of your purchases to our Arizona Sailing Foundation. As of mid-June 2019, the “Amazon Smile” program has donated $333 to ASF.

Your purchases cost the same. Amazon Prime still applies, if you’ve bought that service. ASF just gets a cut of all your dollars.

It’s simple. Instead of buying from amazon.com, you buy from smile.amazon.com. Sign up to have your purchases credited to ASF. That’s it. Takes less than a minute.

If you buy from Amazon, begin buying from smile.amazon.com instead. Route .5% of your money to ASF.

If you buy from Amazon, begin buying from smile.amazon.com instead in order to route .5% of your money to ASF.