Rockin’ Opening Day

It started with a bang and kept going from there.

Joe and Bonnie Motil handled the breakfast. Photo: Deb Heisler

Okay, Opening Day 2019’s opening cannon shot was actually just after Joe and Bonnie Motil’s beautiful breakfast spread, just after Fleet Captain Scott Richards’ welcoming and just before everyone headed out for a magnificent day on the water.

When the racing concluded, the show began. Rear Commodore Deb Heisler was the event organizer and a crowd of volunteers stepped in to help her present dinner, awards, and music to about 60+ sailors.

Mike Ferring’s Saturday and Sunday racing photos and some dinner photos below, but first, let’s offer some credit to the volunteers from Deb’s playbook.

It was Steve Dolter and his B Sides pal Greg playing the Beatle’s tunes. Bob Naylor handled the club trailer, including inventory and cleaning. Joe and Bonnie did breakfast. Maryellen Ferring handled dinner. Martin Lorch was on grill. Ralph Vatalaro mixed the Dark & Stormies. And there were lots of others who pitched in, including Lori Reger, Rob and Colin Gibbs, Emory Heisler, Bob Nesbit, Mark Trainor (who constructed the water filtration system), Scott Richards, Cindy Pillote, Brian Hackman, and more.

Martin Lorch and Joel Hurley picked up where they left off last season: match racing for the lead. Here Joel luffs Martin from leeward. Photo: Mike Ferring

Race Committee both days included David Newland and James Dishong on Whaler, Tony and Neil Chapman, Jim Colceri, Elizabeth Allard, Mike and Maryellen Ferring, Court Roberts, and Mark Trainor on the RC boat.

Deb is trying to turn us all green and drove an effort for recycling and composting. The filtration system system does an amazing job of taking tap water from the hose and turning it into good-tasting stuff that avoids mounds of plastic bottle waste.

Race results are available here.

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth Beals Race October 12 at Lake Pleasant

AYC Founder Ruth Beals.

The all-woman Ruth Beals Cup Regatta will return to Lake Pleasant on Saturday, October 12, with the starting gun at 9:30 am. It’s for women at the helm in run-what-you-brung boats rated by PHRF handicap.

Race documents and registration available here.

The race is named for the founder of AYC, Ruth Beals, and offers a chance for the women of the club to compete against other women. Men are allowed to crew, but not to get too close to the tiller.

There will be a single long-distance race, following the familiar course from a start/finish in the south portion of the lake, around Horse and Balance Rock and a mark north of No-Name island (also called Bobcat), back to a finish line in mid-lake. It’s more or less the same course we’ve used for the Governor’s Cup and the Tall Cactus Regatta.

Cindy Pillote is the defending champion, teaming up with Bob Worrall in his C22 to win in light air one year ago. Maryellen Ferring finished second in her J/70.

Gentle Breeze for TTL Week Two

Jeff Bryant rounding a mark in his Sunfish. Photo: Mike Ferring

That’s the gentle way to describe the generally breeze-less race day (9/15). It didn’t prevent a dozen Lasers, a few Sunfish, Clay Poulson (his own fleet of one Portsmouth) and the Juniors from testing whether they could still move. They did it enough to lay down a few races.

Results? Here they are and here’s that story.

When Dave Christensen retired from race scoring in the spring, Mark Howell bravely volunteered to score both lakes until the club could come up with another answer. Fleet Captain Scott Richards recruited Joel Hurley to score, evaluated various computer scoring programs, and has settled on Sailwave to replace our existing software (which is quite complicated).

The goal is to post results quickly after race days, ideally the same day as the races. Here is the results page.

See, it’s important to stay low in light air to avoid any aerodynamic drag. Photo: Mike Ferring

Joel Hurley winds up for a roll tack at the mark. Photo: Mike Ferring

Stacey and Dave Haggart coaching the juniors. Photo: Mike Ferring

Lori Aoki’s Sunfish in the sparkles of a Sunday afternoon. Photo: Mike Ferring

Around the World Solo Nonstop: October Meeting

Bearded Jerome Rand after 271 days at sea.

Imagine sailing 271 days at sea. Around the world. By yourself and without stopping. On a 32-foot boat built in 1975. Frightening idea? Foolish? Probably. But that’s what Jerome Rand did and he lived to tell us about it.

Jerome is our speaker at the next AYC monthly meeting, beginning at 7p on Tuesday, October 8, at Dave & Buster’s at Tempe Marketplace (map). It’s near Lucille’s Smokehouse. Arrive early for dinner (and avoid ordering during the meeting). Members and guests are welcome.

Since returning home safely, Jerome has been presenting the story of his incredible journey. In the 271 days at sea, supplies and food fell short, equipment broke down, and the harsh environment took its toll. Being farther from land than rescue can reach, it was up to him to deal with all the problems as they came, all while living in isolation aboard the tiny vessel. It’s a story of perseverance and just trying to hold mind, body and boat together from beginning to end.

Jerome kept photos and video of his trip and will bring those to show us, along with charts and diagrams of the journey. He started in Gloucester, Massachusetts, headed across the North Atlantic almost to the Azores, then turned south. Passing by the Cape Verde Islands on the way to the Equator, the route passed the North East Trade winds and then plunged into the Doldrums. From there it was south on a heading for Cape Town, South Africa, to pass into the Indian Ocean and the Southern Ocean gales and south of Australia, New Zealand, and finally Cape Horn. Then, once again he crossed the South Atlantic and North Atlantic on the way home to Gloucester.

Mike and Maryellen Ferring got to know Jerome as the charismatic, fun director of watersports at the Bitter End Yacht Club in the British Virgin Islands. They followed Jerome’s trip on Facebook (yes, even in ocean isolation there’s Facebook) and are delighted to have him speak at the October AYC gathering.

The 32-foot Westsail that Jerome sailed nonstop around the world. Built in 1975, it’s the only Westsail 32 to complete a nonstop circumnavigation.

TTL Fall Series Opening Day

By Marc Danner

The day started with the Junior More sailing class rigging boats with new sails! (The ASF board voted to replace the well-worn original sails with crisp new ones.) The kids practiced starts, rounding the marks in the right direction and trying capsize drills (to cool off).

There was excitement in the air with the new Sunfish fleet getting a pep talk from fleet captain Bob Naylor. Bob drummed up a fleet with eight entrants this summer so he had other Sunfish to race against in his (actually his wife’s) new boat.

The wind did not disappoint! As each fleet started, the wind continued to build from the southwest, testing everyone’s skills and dumping several in the drink. Commodore Rob Gibbs assisted boats as they lay on their sides.

Many fleets were able to get three or more races in before the wind became too strong to continue. The Junior fleet played in the water while others struggled to get back to the dock, but all made it safely.

Here are the results.

To cap it off, the day ended with a celebration gathering at Fates Brewery.