About Mike Ferring

Author Archive | Mike Ferring

Lake Pleasant Race Scores

The results from Lake Pleasant Racing are posted on the Results page or by clicking here.

How to Keep You Interested in AYC

Participation in sailing and yacht clubs has been eroding for the last many years and plenty of people have expressed an opinion about how to slow or reverse this nasty trend. Here’s one of the most interesting ones, from former ISAF president Paul Henderson. In a nutshell: Keep it simple, inexpensive, local, and fun. There’s a formula we can all get behind!cat22_fall2003

LPSC Pancake Breakfast Saturday, April 6 – $5

pancakesWhether you prefer to call them pancakes, flapjacks, griddle cakes, Hobo Nickels, or Flap Sams, this breakfast food is too good to pass up. Come to Lake Pleasant and make a day of it with the educational event to follow or to head out for the day of AYC racing.

Pancakes and other breakfast attractions will be served starting at 8am on Saturday (April 6)  and run to around 10am. You’ll find us at Ramada #1 and 2 closest to the Sailboat Shop. Cost is $5.00 for adults and $2.00 for children ages 4-12.

Some important perspective on the morning: A pancake is a thin, flat, round cake prepared from a batter and cooked on a hot griddle or frying pan. In Britain it is made without a raising agent, and is similar to a crêpe. In America, a raising agent is used (typically baking powder). The American pancake is similar to a Scotch pancake or drop.

They may be served at any time with a variety of toppings or fillings including jam, fruit, syrup, chocolate chips, or meat. In America, they are typically considered to be a breakfast food. In Britain and the Commonwealth, they are associated with Shrove Tuesday, commonly known as Pancake Day, when perishable ingredients had to be used up before the fasting period of Lent.

Please join the finest batch of LPSC sailors around as we pay homage to the delectable pancake!

—Rhonda Brewer, LPSC

Catalina 22 Fleet Parties

desert-sailors6

The latest edition of the Catalina 22 fleet newsletter.

Despite some nasty weather, the Catalina 22 fleet drew a big bunch of current and past fleet members to a March party. Read about it in the latest edition of the fleet’s newsletter.

 

March 27-28 Lake Pleasant Racing

The scores for the weekend of racing at Lake Pleasant can be found on the results page or by clicking here.

Southern California Racing Calendar

Here’s a link to the Southern California Yachting Association member clubs calendar, including the Arizona Yacht Club.

Click to link to the full publication.

Click to link to the full publication.

Taking America’s Cup to the Max

The cup is coming but what got us there?

AC72For the April monthly meeting, Philip Freedman offers his view of America’s Cup 34 and what it takes to compete for the sport’s oldest trophy. The meeting is at 7 pm, Tuesday, April 9, at the Caddy Shack @ Rolling Hills, 1415 North Mill Avenue, Tempe. Visitors are welcome.

A meteor has hit the America’s Cup and the dinosaurs have disappeared. The oldest sports trophy has become of age. In one of the biggest sport upgrades in history, the America’s Cup has roared into the 21st century and you better use a fast shutter speed to take a shot. This summer in San Francisco Bay, the 34th America’s Cup will be defended against three countries wanting to take it out of the U.S. An estimated 600,000 will watch the competition from the banks of San Francisco Bay. Never before has the America’s Cup been sailed in a bay rather than in the ocean where few could see.

These are not just sailboats, but 72-foot-long catamarans with 13-story hard-wing masts that go twice the spend of the wind and rise out of the water onto small foils. Their crew of 11 not only wears heart monitors, life jackets and helmets, but will take physical requirements to the limits.

So come spend a fun evening and hear how college, youth sailing and the twelve meters got us to where we are today. Phil warns: This will be fun.

Phil Freedman is an AYC member and longtime sailor who fielded the entry Betsy Ross for the 1990 America’s Cup challenge.

Week 6 TTL Results.

Week 6 of racing at TTL scores posted on the results page or by clicking here.

The Sailing Life of Andrew Campbell

Andrew Campbell sailing a Star on the US Sailing Team.

Andrew Campbell sailing a Star on the US Sailing Team.

Olympian and 10-time national champion Andrew Campbell looks at the big sailing picture. Boil it down to something like this: explore and enjoy. Sure, there’s a lot we can learn about wind shifts and boat handling and that kind of thing, but a lot of the advice he offered the AYC monthly meeting on Tuesday, March 12 was bigger than that.

Here were his bullet points:

  • Clear air (get in it)
  • Practice like you mean it
  • Even when it’s uncomfortable
  • Sail weird boats
  • Sail with old friends
  • Make new friends (he got to meet President George W. Bush)
  • Sail against the best
  • Study and learn every chance you get
  • Sail with lots of people
  • Sail with kids (You never know what will inspire them)
  • Sail in new places

The big point is that you learn through these broad experiences, picking up something about sailing or just about life itself. Or you just have a good time with friends.

Whoa. Is this the the message from a cutthroat, world-class sailor? From a calm, focused one, it is.

Andrew is a 10-time national champion at the youth, high school, collegiate levels. Racing in the Laser and Star class, he competed on the Olympic Class World Cup level during 10 years on the US Sailing Team. He won the 2007 Pan Am Games, represented the United States at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, and was ranked #4 in the World in the Star class in 2011. Now Andrew’s professional sailing and coaching experience has set him up to expand into big boats and match racing as well as writing for sailing publications.

Sailing Champion Andrew Campbell at the AYC monthly meeting.

Sailing Champion Andrew Campbell at the AYC monthly meeting.

Tempe Town Lake Scores

The results from today’s “fluky” day of racing can be found on the results page or by clicking here.

High School Championship Saturday, April 20

2012 High School Champions

2012 High School Champions

The annual High School Championship regatta will be Saturday, April 20, at Tempe Town Lake. The boats will be C14s, using boats from the Arizona Sailing Foundation (ASF). Here are the documents you’ll need to enter. Contact Regatta Organizer George Tingom if you have questions.

Notice of Race
Sailing Instructions
Entry Form

Lake Pleasant Scores

The results from the 2nd week of racing at Lake Pleasant are posted on the results page or by clicking here.

March Meeting: Sailing Coach Andrew Campbell

Andrew Campbell sailing a Star on the US Sailing Team.

Andrew Campbell sailing a Star on the US Sailing Team.

Fresh off an Olympic Star campaign, Andrew Campbell is a busy sailing coach and tactician… and our March Monthly Meeting Speaker. Would you like a boatload of racing tips? Andrew’s your guy. He’ll speak at 7 pm, Tuesday, March 12, at the Caddy Shack @ Rolling Hills, 1415 North Mill Avenue, Tempe.

His bio on the Andrew Campbell website describes his work as a tactician on the Farr 40 Nightshift, his coaching, and much more. It says, “As a professional sailor, coach and writer, Andrew draws from experience in Olympic and top international sailboat racing. He is a ten-time national champion at the youth, high school, collegiate levels. Racing in the Laser and Star class, he competed on the Olympic Class World Cup level during 10 years on the US Sailing Team. He won the 2007 Pan Am Games, represented the United States at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, and was ranked #4 in the World in the Star class in 2011. Andrew’s professional sailing and coaching experience has enabled him to expand into big boats and match racing as well as writing for sailing publications.”

AndyCampbell

Andrew Campbell

AYC welcomes nonmembers at our events, including the monthly meetings.

What happens on starts when there aren’t five boats in a fleet?

AYC has had a long-standing policy that if takes five boats to make a racing fleet, while also saying that a fleet with fewer boats may request its own start. After an online discussion, Fleet Captain Greg Woodcock has offered this further explanation:

Greg Woodcock is the Fleet Captain, in charge of keeping all the AYC floating stock in good repair and leading the fleets to races year around. Greg has been PHRF Non-Spin Fleet Captain (and champ) but now races a Santana 20.

Greg Woodcock is the Fleet Captain, in charge of keeping all the AYC floating stock in good repair and leading the fleets to races year around. Greg has been PHRF Non-Spin Fleet Captain (and champ) but now races a Santana 20.

Race Committee should take a customer-supplier (racer-race committee) attitude. I think this is already taking place. The fleets should feel free to make requests to the race committee and the race committee should accommodate requests when they make sense and comply with the RRS and SI.

So, if there are two fleet captains who want to start together, just ask the race committee. Maybe you want to do starts with a lot of boats on the line; if the fleets agree, I’m all for it. If you want to sail all triangles or all windward/leeward, let the race committee know.

What about starting one-boat fleets by themselves? I discussed this issue with the LP Portsmouth fleet captain, for example, and he said he didn’t want to start by himself. I discussed it with the Thistle fleet captain, who said putting a single Portsmouth boat with them did not cause a problem in the past. I hope that continues to work out and we can do the same with other fleets. (Portsmouth needs to recruit more active racers though!)

More starts means longer start sequences. At Lake Pleasant, it’s 10 minutes for two additional starts—and most likely just the first start of the day. After that, starts should occur as each fleet completes the course. At Tempe Town Lake, it would be an additional three minutes for an additional start. I don’t think the fleets that want to sail by themselves would view this as much of a downside. If you really want to shorten the start sequence, just find some fleet captains who want to start together and let the race committee know. If you want to make it permanent, you could even put it in your fleet rules.

This additional thought from Commodore Mike Ferring: If your fleet is running into conflicts with boats from other fleets, please try to work out the issues with the individuals. Some of the competitors are inexperienced or unfamiliar with the Racing Rules of Sailing and may not know that they shouldn’t barge at the start or don’t know about the three-boat-length rule at the marks. Let’s bring them up to speed so they can mix it up with the rest of us (who may know the rules but push them)!

 

LPSC Will Not Dye Lake Pleasant Green

Because we don’t live in Chicago, don’t expect Lake Pleasant to be dyed green for St. Patrick’s Day. But Lake Pleasant Sailing Club (LPSC) can expect a great day of sailing and an even greater raft up on March 9-10.

The day will start with a Pot-of-Gold Treasure Hunt on Lake Pleasant. Ten numbered pots of gold will be hidden on the shore around the lake. You’ll be given 10 clues to help you find the treasure. In order to confirm your success, you must take a digital picture of  each pot-of-gold. The boat  crew with the most pictures will win a prize. In case of a tie, your cruise directors will think of some blarney-inspired way to declare one winner at the raft up that follows. Watch for more details on the LPSC website.

At 4 pm the Paynes and the Goldmans are hoping you’ll join them for a fun, blarney-filled raft-up in a location yet to be announced. Be ready to party hearty with the LPSC Irish and/or Irish wannabees. They’re planning a contest to test your knowledge of Irish trivia and a limerick competition. Please bring an appetizer or dessert to share (the more Irish-themed the better). Please plan to enjoy dinner on your own boat. Watch Meetup, the website and email for more details. Of course, all AYC members are invited to join LPSC at this event.

—Rhonda Brewer

AYC Volunteers Clean SR-74

Blue bags collect trash on the side of Carefree Highway.

Blue bags collect trash on the side of Carefree Highway.

Thanks to 10 volunteers who did their part to maintain AYC’s commitment to the Adopt-a-Highway program.

In 2½ hours on a Saturday morning they filled nearly 50 bags with trash along a ¾ mile stretch of SR-74. The day was complemented by beautiful weather, several hot air balloons landing nearby, and a good lunch courtesy of AYC.

If you’re interested in helping on a future clean up, please contact organizer Peter Lehrach.

The crew (left to right): Martin Lorch, Thom Dickerson, Jeff Sloan, Juan Gagna, Jake Wease, Paul Eyssautier, and Kyle Clark. Volunteers not pictured: Pierce Cunningham, Michael Parker, and Peter Lehrach (who took the picture)

The crew (left to right): Martin Lorch, Thom Dickerson, Jeff Sloan, Juan Gagna, Jake Wease, Paul Eyssautier, and Kyle Clark. Volunteers not pictured: Pierce Cunningham, Michael Parker, and Peter Lehrach (who took the picture).

Tempe Town Lake Scores

The results of this week’s racing at Tempe Town Lake are posted on the Results page or by clicking here.

This is the right time for crew to join AYC

If you crew, we’d like you to join the Arizona Yacht Club.

It’s not just for boat owners, but for crew as well and right now you can join for the initiation fee ($150) and half the annual dues ($62.50), because the AYC year is half over. (You’ll need to renew your membership for $125 next summer.) Click this link to sign up!

Why join? To support this great sport, to make sure we have the boats, marks, programs and events for you to enjoy! Don’t leave it to others—join in.

Peter Lehrach crews for me (Commodore Mike Ferring) on our J/80 and he’s not only become a member, but he’s been active on the AYC board of directors and organizes our highway cleaning program. Here’s what he has to say:

 

Peter Lehrach is the AYC Secretary and a new member of the club. He moved to the area in 2011 after competing in various boats and regattas in the East and South. Peter crews on Commodore Mike Ferring's J/80.

Peter Lehrach is the AYC Secretary and a new member of the club. He moved to the area in 2011 after competing in various boats and regattas in the East and South. Peter crews on Commodore Mike Ferring’s J/80.

The only boat I’ve ever owned was a Sunfish more than 30 years ago. Yet I love sailing; I love racing. And I’ve done a lot of it.

I’ve had the privilege of crewing on other people’s boats extensively on the East, West, and Gulf coasts and several lakes and rivers across America. I’ve also had international racing experiences in or to Mexico, the Caribbean, Bermuda, and England. I learned very early in my crewing career that if you have some skill, cheerfully volunteer to assist in maintenance, and (most importantly) reliably show up then further opportunities and referrals easily come your way. In many ways I had it dialed in perfectly: I got to do my favorite activity, at little personal expense, and I was appreciated by the boat owner. Our relationship was a benefit to both of us. Until recently however, I never joined a yacht club. In hindsight, that was wrong.

I rationalized that only boat owners need to be members. I thought my use of yacht club facilities (launches, showers, bars, restaurants, etc.), purchase of club-branded shirts, participation in racing, social, and educational events were all necessary for “my” boat owners to take advantage of their yacht club privileges and any personal benefit I received was a show of appreciation from the boat owners.

I now realize that while I had been giving and taking with the boat owner, my relationship with the yacht club had been one-way. I further realized that yacht clubs are the community that enables my favorite activity. You see, without a club there is no racing as it takes more than one boat to have a race. It takes more than one boat crew to have a social event. It takes several interested sailors to attract an educational speaker.

Because of the Arizona Yacht Club, we can get our feet wet in the desert even when there is snow and ice on boats elsewhere in the country. How many people can say that? The racing is well run and competitive, the race committee boats and marks are of high quality, and the opportunities to network and learn with likeminded sailors is unique for the area.

Chances are, if you are a long-time crew, you’ve thought about joining the AYC and then rationalized it away as I once did. For those who have since become members, thank you! If not, please reconsider: AYC needs your membership to strengthen our desert sailing community. Compared to other places I’ve sailed, AYC member financial obligations are downright cheap. The reciprocal privileges are fantastic. Participation on committees and helping with events are personal growth opportunities and will make you feel good. I know I do.

Thank you for considering my message and I’ll see you on the water,
Peter Lehrach AYC Secretary
AYC Member since 2012 (602.741.2016)

Southern California Racing Calendar

Here’s a link to the 2013 calendar for the Southern California Yachting Association, which includes the Arizona Yacht Club.

Click to link to the full publication.

Click image to link to the full publication.

Plans for new, giant TTL wind twister?

Martin Lorch spotted this interesting story in the Business Journal: plans for a new, huge facility on the south shore of Tempe Town Lake. The million square foot campus for State Farm insurance would employ 5,00-7,000. Good news? Possible sailors, I guess.