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May Meeting: Weather for Sailors

Consider this quote from one of the most experienced navigators in the world: “To a sailor, understanding weather is as important as boat preparation and knowing how to tack.”

John Jourdane. Photo: Sailing World

The navigator is John Jourdane and the quote introduces the book, Modern Weather for Sailors. It also introduces our May monthly meeting speaker, that same guy and the book’s author, John Jourdane.

The meeting is Tuesday, May 8, beginning at 7pm (but arrive early for dinner). Monthly meetings are held at Aces @ Rolling Hills Golf Course, 1415 North Mill Avenue, Tempe, AZ 85281-1205 (map) and both members and non-members are welcome to attend.

You may remember John from his November 2013 visit, when he regaled the club with stories of his travels. He’s sailed over 300,000 miles, covering the distance between the West Coast and Hawaii 54 times, crossing the Atlantic Ocean 12 times, and sailing around the world three times, including two Whitbread Round the World Races.

How’s that for preparation for explaining (briefly) this complex subject: weather and how it affects sailors.

 

John Jourdane’s book on sailing weather.

Commodore’s Celebration Saturday, May 19

Last year’s Commodore’s Celebration at The Yard in Tempe went so well we decided to do it again. Will you join us?

Commodore’s Celebration Sign Up Here

Dress is business casual. Members and nonmembers are welcome to attend. Saturday, May 20. Cocktails at 6:30 pm, dinner at 7 pm.

Here’s a link to the Google map of the location.

The menu includes:

  • Soft Pretzels and Provolone Fondue
  • Caesar Salad
  • Meat Loaf with Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy
  • Roasted Salmon with Cauliflower, Snow Peas
  • Baked Penne Pasta with Butternut Cream Sauce, Roasted Squash, Red Pepper, Herbed Ricotta
  • Apple Cobbler with Bourbon Caramel Dessert

This year’s Commodore at last year’s Commodore’s Celebration.

Here’s a slideshow the Commodore put together.

 

AYC Electronic Voting for Next Board Open Until May 7

If you were a voting-eligible member of the Arizona Yacht Club as of April 1, you’ve received an email allowing you to participate in the election of the next board of directors. Clicking on the link will automatically log you in to the ballot and voting takes only a minute or so.

Members may vote until Monday, May 7 at 6 pm, when electronic voting closes. Ballots will be counted at 6 pm Tuesday, May 8, at Aces at Rolling Hills, where we hold the monthly meeting.

The ballot includes this bunch: Rob Gibbs, Commodore; Marc Danner, Vice Commodore; Sharon Bell, Rear Commodore; George Sheller, Racing Fleet Captain; Heather McClain, Cruising Fleet Captain; Russ Hasty and Skip Kempff, Membership Director (two-year term); Mike Ferring, Jr Staff Commodore. Members may also write in candidates.

Bruce Andress moves to Sr Staff Commodore and Andrew Oliver will continue in the second year of his two-year term as Membership Director. The new board will elect a Secretary and Treasurer.

Rob Gibbs is a familiar face at AYC, currently Vice Commodore after replacing Mike Bernard when Mike’s health required his resignation. Rob has served as Membership Director and is serving as one of the key instructors for the Arizona Sailing Foundation. In addition to the adult Learn to Sail program and the Powerboat Safety classes, Rob teaches the Junior Performance Sailing class, which includes his son Colin.

The 2018 Junior Performance class. Rob Gibbs is the tall one on the right. Photo: Mike Ferring

Safety at Sea Seminar in San Diego June 23-24

Several of the big offshore races are stepping up requirements for Safety at Sea certifications and you’ll have a chance to take one of the two-day sessions June 23-24 at Southwestern Yacht Club in San Diego.

Here’s the link to the registration page. Here’s a flyer with more information.

Organizer John Miller offers this update on requirements:

  • CCA (Newport to Bermuda) will require all racers on all boats to have an World Sailing two-day Safety at Sea (SAS) starting in 2020.
  • Pacific Cup has dropped the one-day and is only accepting the World Sailing two-day SAS for 2018.
  • TransPac is discussing and it is assumed that they will drop the one-day and only accept the World Sailing two-day for 2019.
  • WCC (ARC series) has dropped the one-day and will only accept the two-day starting in 2017.
  • Vic-Maui has recently clarified that the two-day is the only Offshore Certification program being accepted as part of its NOR’s.

He also notes:

  • Starting in June, you can renew/refresh (prior to expiration) your current two-day by taking the Hands-on (single day) training. No longer do you need to take the full two-day course.
  • Sailors can also UPGRADE their one-day SAS (prior to expiration) to a two-day by taking the Hands-on Training Only (one day commitment).

Questions? Contact John at this email address.

Checking out safety equipment in a pool.

Chase the Tall Cactus

Ready to chase the Tall Cactus? The race is Saturday, April 28, with the first boats starting at 9 am. This is a pursuit race, in the style of the Governor’s Cup, which attracted over 50 boats in December. Okay, it’s a carbon copy, except that this time everybody will find all the islands and the finish line. Or they should.

Sign up and find the documents on the Racing page.

The course takes you from a start line in the middle of the lake (exact position will vary depending on wind strength), north to take Horse and Balance Rock islands to port, then heading south to leave Bobcat Island to port and then finishing at Scorpion Bay Marina, where we’ll celebrate with club-provided nibbles and a cash bar. (Be sure to tip well; apparently some of you didn’t in December.)

Now, what was that about “Bobcat Island”? It’s the chunk of land that we’ve been calling “No Name Island” up to now, but Event Chairman Tom Errickson has learned it’s actually and officially called Bobcat Island. How to recognize it? It’s very hard to see until you’re right on top of it, since it blends into the hills behind. After rounding Balance Rock, if you set a course for about 150°, you’ll be pointing in the right direction. Aim to the right of the cell phone towers on the hill. You’ll need to clear the point at Two Cow Cove, near where the Sheriff’s station sits, and then head a little to the right.

The GPS coordinates are (approximately) 33°51′17″ N 112°16′50″ W or, in decimals, 33.854853 N 112.281728 W.

After Bobcat, go to Scorpion Bay Marina, round to the north of all the breakwaters and sail toward the shore. You’ll spot the finish line. Finish and then tie up and join us for adult beverages. Here’s a satellite picture of Scorpion showing the finish line.

Here are pictures showing Bobcat. The pictures were taken in early March, with high lake level.

That little island with a tuft of vegetation is Bobcat Island. Picture was taken from the Discovery Center looking north. Photo: Mike Ferring

 

Bobcat Island is hard to see, even when you’re close. It blends in with the background. Photo: Mike Ferring

 

As you begin to round Bobcat, it emerges from the background. Photo: Mike Ferring

April Monthly Meeting: Spectacular Sailing Photography

Photographer Daniel Forster

Daniel Forster will arrive at our April monthly meeting armed with a spectacular portfolio of sailing photos and a lifetime of sailing stories. Just to skim some off the top: He’s photographed the last 13 America’s Cups and 12 Olympic Games.

Now Daniel is one of the official photographers for the Rolex Yachting events, covering such regattas as the Rolex Miami Olympic Class Regatta, St. Thomas, New York Yacht Club events, Rolex Fastnet Race, Rolex Big Boat Series in San Francisco, Rolex Swan Cup, Rolex Middle Sea Race and the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race.

Take a look at his website. Or watch this Vimeo video for a taste of great images.

Daniel will be our monthly meeting speaker Tuesday, April 10, beginning at 7pm (but arrive early for dinner). Monthly meetings are held at Aces restaurant (that’s apparently what they’re calling it now) at Rolling Hills Golf Course, 1415 North Mill Avenue, Tempe, AZ 85281-1205 (map) and both members and non-members are welcome to attend.

A J Boat against a brilliant sky. Photo: Daniel Forster

The amazing Comanche at speed. Photo: Daniel Forster

Blasting through the seas against granite skies at the Fastnet. Photo: Daniel Forster

New Trophies for AYC Racers

Thistle start picture used on the new trophy for Lake Pleasant winners. Photo: Mike Ferring

We’re making a major change in trophies this year that I hope you’ll like. Instead of giving a pickle dish or wine glass for each series, you’ll receive your own AYC Member Trophy plaque and add awards to it in the years to come.

The first time you’re eligible for a trophy, you’ll get one of these AYC Member Trophy plaques with space for 12 award plates describing how you finished in various races or series. As you win more (I’m looking at you Mike Hester), you’ll receive an additional trophy plate that you’ll stick on the plaque.

The trophies were custom made by Prisma Graphic in Phoenix. The plaque itself is an acrylic with the graphically-treated photo adhered to the back. The AYC disc on the upper left is a three-dimensional piece produced on two layers and attached to the front of the plaque.

The member trophy will look like one of these when filled with plates. Instead of a trophy for each time you place in a series, you’ll get a brass-colored plate to stick on the trophy.

What’s it like to sail the Oracle Team USA cat?

Hard. Very hard. And complicated.

Speaking to February’s AYC monthly meeting, Oracle Team USA tactician Andrew Campbell said that despite the level of competition, sailing is sailing, with tactics similar to the ones he started learning as a Sabot sailor in San Diego almost three decades ago. The rest? Sailing the America’s Cup boat in Bermuda required a level of fitness unmatched in sailing, pumping maximum heart rate through a 20-minute race, dashing in coordinated choreography across the platform, and keeping the boat flying with controls less sophisticated than a foiling moth.

The complexity of the boat was amazing, for instance offering the ability to fine-tune the shape of the wing by adjusting camber differently from top to bottom depending on wind conditions. The team collected immense amounts of data that they spent hours analyzing in order to improve speed and handling.

In the end, of course, it wasn’t enough, but Andrew believes that Oracle Team USA might have been able to overcome Emirates Team New Zealand if they’d been able to compete in wind conditions more suited to their boat. More wind or less wind, he says, would have moved ETNZ out of its sweet spot and moved Oracle into its design target, enabling the US team to overcome the excellent sailing and design of the Kiwis.

How about the next America’s Cup in Auckland? The planned design will be a huge challenge, he says, but the boats will be fast and more maneuverable, with less energy spent pumping oil through the hydraulic system and more spent sailing. Watch for the personable and able Andrew Campbell to be part of it all.

 

Andrew Campbell at February’s AYC meeting. Photo: David Newland

 

February: Oracle’s Andrew Campbell

Andrew Campbell

Five years ago, Olympic Laser sailor Andrew Campbell spoke to us at the Arizona Yacht Club. Now he’s been gracious enough to agree to a repeat visit, only this time he’s coming off an intense time as one of the tacticians for the Oracle Team USA America’s Cup campaign and one of the commentators for the television coverage of the event.

In 2016 he explained his America’s Cup role to Scuttlebutt, saying, “On the water I monitor multiple boats to make sure that we’re efficiently using our time. It doesn’t sound too bad until you consider that I’m also helping the mode choices for our boat, checking relatives against the other boat… and grinding our wingsheet, taking breaks while sprinting across the platform to the new helm to help steer through tacks and gybes.”

Andrew will be our monthly meeting speaker Tuesday, February 13, beginning at 7pm (but arrive early for dinner). Monthly meetings are held at the Caddy Shack @ Rolling Hills Golf Course, 1415 North Mill Avenue, Tempe, AZ 85281-1205 (map) and both members and non-members are welcome to attend.

After earning a spot as a four-time All-American at Georgetown University, Andrew went on to compete in the Laser class at the 2008 Olympics. (He met his wife, Jacqueline Schmitz, at Georgetown, where they were both members of the sailing team. They now have twin girls.)

The Campbells are a sailing family. Andrew’s father, Bill Campbell, is a three-time America’s Cup sailor who was part of Bill Koch’s team that won the Cup in 1992. Bill is also a former Commodore of the San Diego Yacht Club.

USA Today quoted Bill Campbell saying his son’s mantra during his sailing career has been, “Keep showing up.” He tells a story of Andrew driving home from high school in La Jolla, Calif., and stopping at Mission Bay Yacht Club, where he kept a Laser.

“He’d stop, put the boat in the water, go out, tack a hundred times, jibe a hundred times, put the boat away and come home. He did that all the time,” Bill Campbell said.

“You keep showing up; you keep practicing. By showing up all the time, you’re doing more than the other guys. You’re getting better, and hopefully the results will show that. His commitment to the sport and his commitment to doing that was always impressive to me.”

Andrew Campbell (center) grinding in Bermuda.

Race Management Courses Available

AYC could use some more qualified race management people. Are you interested in learning more about how to run a regatta?

Here’s information on one coming up in Denver on April 7&8. The link for enrollment in the one-day race management course is here: http://www1.ussailing.org/enrollment/selectregistrant.aspx?courseid=13451835

They’ll also be doing a course for judges. That link is: http://www1.ussailing.org/enrollment/selectregistrant.aspx?courseid=13451836

The cost per class is $60 which includes course material, lite snacks and lunch. Upon completion of the course a link will be sent to take the test online.

Commodore Curtis Rist says they might be able to provide some lodging if folks need it.

Here’s his contact information: phone 303-779-2631 or mobile 719-648-1830. His email is rmsail.org 

Here’s a summary:
Sailing Assn of Intermountain Lakes
1570 South Logan Street
Denver, CO 80210
Contact: Curtis Rist
Instructors: Paul Kresge, Julie Rist

This course will run from 0900-1700.
Location: 8821 E. Amherst Avenue, Denver Colorado
Breakfast and lunch included.

You’ll also find these race management courses on the West Coast, if that’s more convenient:

One Day Race Management Seminar at Mission Bay Yacht Club
3/31/2018 – 3/31/2018
Mission Bay Yacht Club
1215 El Carmel Place
San Diego, CA 92109
Contact: Mark Townsend
Instructors: Stan Betts

$50 seminar fee includes course material, online testing, continental breakfast, fruit, iced tea, soft drinks and water all day. The Club snack bar will be available for lunch. Seminar will run from 0800 – 1700 and be held at the Mission Bay Yacht Club. Online registration closes on Monday, March 26th @ 2355 (Eastern).

One Day Race Management Seminar at King Harbor Yacht Club
3/31/2018 – 3/31/2018
King Harbor Yacht Club
280 Yacht Club Way
Redondo Beach, CA 90277
Contact: Dorian Harris
Instructors: Bill Stump

This seminar will run from 0800-1700. A continental breakfast with a coffee and water station will be available. The galley will be open for lunch. The cost of the seminar is $40.

One Day Race Management Seminar at Sailing Assn of Intermountain Lakes
4/07/2018 – 4/07/2018 Add to your calendar

Lake Pleasant Weekend Three

Notice to everyone who raced only Saturday: You missed the best wind of the weekend. Sunday morning started with cresting whitecaps and settled into a pleasant 8kts, serving up a trip around Horse Island for the spins and three very quick Thistle races. (Thistles have a long-standing rule to race just three races per day.)

In contrast, Saturday was a sailing snooze, with most races (we still call them races) drifters. When some breeze licked across the lake at the end of the day, the spins said, “Start us!” only to find they’d been tricked, the wind went away and the race abandoned. Of course, sipping a beer at Spinnaker Point, we looked out on a lake rippled with wind. Always the way, right?

The results for week three of racing at Lake Pleasant are posted on the results page, or click here.

Charles Landis and team after rounding Horse Island on Sunday morning. Photo: Mike Ferring

Scott Richards and Dan Schott cross. Photo: Mike Ferring

Little Wind for TTL Week 4

We decided to call it “rigging practice,” since sailing was, well, slow. This Sunday at Tempe Town Lake the wind started light and then turned lighter, allowing the Lasers and 14.2s to get one extremely slow race on the books.

Here are the results.

October Meeting: North U Founder Bill Gladstone

The October Monthly Meeting Speaker, North U’s Bill Gladstone. Photo: Mike Ferring

The crazy-windy 2016 Chicago to Mac was tossing our J/130 around like a toy when the helmsman (no, not me) made a bit of a mistake—the huge, green spinnaker suddenly wrapping around the headstay, wind blasts threatening to rip the spinnaker to bits. Raining, dead dark, we call for Bill. Bill Gladstone. He pokes his head up from below and calmly goes to work, unflappable despite the roar of the flapping sail, asking for a couple jibes to unwrap the sail and minutes later we’re back on course, sail intact.

This was Bill’s 28th Chicago to Mac, so he’s seen a lot of nutty stuff on Lake Michigan and lots of other places. He takes it all in calmly, with a smile and a laugh that help explain how he’s been able to take teaching performance sailing and turn it into a lifetime vocation. His business is North U, which presents seminars each year around the country plus the Regatta Experience and clinics in Ontario, Captiva Island, Florida, and St. Thomas.

In October, Bill will offer AYC a short version of one of his workshops, spinning stories as he suggests tactics, rules, and trim. Expect to be as much entertained as informed.

The meeting is Tuesday, October 10, beginning at 7pm (but arrive early for dinner). Monthly meetings are held at the Caddy Shack @ Rolling Hills Golf Course, 1415 North Mill Avenue, Tempe, AZ 85281-1205 (map) and both members and non-members are welcome to attend.

Bill’s racing experience covers the spectrum, including everything from dinghies to Maxies, ponds to oceans, and foredeck to helm. He has finished in the money at Key West Race Week, the SORC, Block Island Race Week, Chicago NOOD, Annapolis to Newport; Chicago to Mackinac, the Annapolis Fall Series, NYYC Race Week, and Queen’s Cup. Bill raced collegiately for Yale and was founder of the Chicago Sailing Club.

He’s been teaching sailing and racing for over forty years. Graduates of his seminars number in the thousands, including several dozen AYC members.

Bill Gladstone on the rail for the Chicago-Mackinac race in 2016. That’s Maryellen Ferring over Bill’s left ear. Photo: Mike Ferring

Blustery Opening Weekend at Lake Pleasant

The Fall Series opening weekend was a blast—a blast of wind on both Saturday and Sunday!

Saturday (9/23) was the big day for participation, with 14 boats racing in the multi-hull races, zinging across the lake on double-digit reaches and big smiles. Overall, there are 41 entries for the fall, with more still trickling in, especially from the PHRF Spin fleet, which was on Race Committee, giving entrants an excuse to wait another couple weeks before they really have to sign up.

Unfortunately, the Santana 20s did not get the needed five boats to fleet, which means they’ll be folded into the spin fleet, creating a wide range of ratings for the spins. There are enough Santana 20s in the club, but several decided not to enter.

And the debut of the MarkSetBot, the robotic mark? “Awesome,” is how Paul Liszewski summed it up. “I had my doubts,” he said, “but it did an excellent job.” It was a day when normal, anchored marks went adrift (one getting beached on an island), but the robotic mark just treaded water at the end of the start line, not moving. Same on Sunday, when Roger Butterwick said that he too was a doubter, not believing the mark could remain motionless for hours, but he was convinced by the end of the day’s racing.

The “Munchies on the Hill” after racing also had a nice debut. Steve Nahkala brought a table of munchies and a cooler of beer to Spinnaker Point as we transition from Fleet Dinner to Fleet Nachos and Beer. Some 35 people came by, about the same as a dinner group. (But the Catalina 22 fleet is planning to offer a Fleet Dinner the next race Saturday, October 7.)

Here are the race results.

Mark Howell is the scorekeeping SuperSub while Dave Christensen is sight-seeing around Europe. It took Dave’s knack for reading chicken bones to sort out this weekend, especially the multi-hull fleet.

Tony Chapman calmly hikes as his Viper 640 decides whether to splash down. Tony spent the summer in heavy wind races in Lake Garda and The Gorge and honed his big wind skill. Left: Court Roberts and team applaud. Photo: Charles Landis

It’s True: The Race Mark is a Robot!

Tom Ohlin watches a test of the new MarkSetBot on Lake Pleasant. Photo: Mike Ferring

It’s a bit of a leap of faith, a broad jump really: The pin-end start mark on Lake Pleasant’s Opening Day (9/23) will be a robot.

The inventors call it MarkSetBot and AYC is one of six clubs in the nation beta-testing this new device (out of 40 clubs that said they’d like to do it). It’s an odd-looking contraption on the water, riding on two inflated catamaran hulls, propelled by an electric trolling motor, and guided by cell phone and GPS navigation. It skitters around on the water like a large play toy.

Lake Pleasant Lake Captain David Newland and I (Mike Ferring) have been working on this machine for several weeks now, finally getting to the point where we think it can work as the pin-end mark. Later it might become one of the other marks of the course. Tom Ohlin joined us as we ran the thing for over an hour on Wednesday (9/20) and it performed nicely.

The idea, of course, is to replace one of our regular marks with the robot so it can be placed remotely without relying on the Boston Whaler crew and without dangling 160+ feet of anchor rode below it. Because the RC wouldn’t need to move the Whaler into position and because nobody would need to lift and drop or drag all that rode, the course can be adjusted much faster and much more easily. Cool, huh?

The company reports that this last weekend (9/17) MarkSetBots made up the entire race course for the stadium race at Grosse Pointe (Michigan) Yacht Club run by Premiere Sailing League. There was a single RC boat with only one person on it. That person monitored for OCS and then acted as a judge boat motoring up the course. The course was changed in length and direction many times. At one point, there was a 90 degree wind shift and it took the MarkSetBots just 60 seconds to reposition. Wow.

The MarkSetBot is not without its, well, let’s call them “issues,” which means we’re moving cautiously and wondering whether this robot is  long-term for us. Just a few of the issues:

  • It’s big and unwieldy to launch and to store.
  • It needs to be assembled each time it’s used (and disassembled when we’re through with it).
  • It runs on a battery that needs to be charged.
  • It’s made up of lots of little bits that can be damaged, lost or wear out.
  • The cell phone interface is difficult to operate.
  • Operation requires training (and we have trouble getting people to take care of our boats).

So, that odd thing at the end of the start line? That’s your starting pin. Please don’t hit it.

The robot MarkSetBot at cruising speed during the Lake Pleasant test. Photo: Mike Ferring

Results of TTL Weekend Two

Temperatures eased off a bit for weekend two of the Tempe Town Lake Fall Series, with Lasers on RC. The results of the afternoon are here or on the results page.

Picnic, Play, Party at the “Hoot at the Lake”

All for fun: The Hoot at the Lake party on Saturday, September 30, from 10am to 1pm at the Grassy Knoll at Tempe Town Lake.

Mike Bernard has planned a bunch of zany sailing games for  the Hoot, including such things as backward sailing, competition pitting 50+ codgers and kids, and some SUP board rides.

Sharon Bell is bringing her Corn Hole game and Horseshoes for dry land play.

Maryellen Ferring is heading up the food brigade, planning a barbecue at lake’s edge.

Andy Oliver is the Chairman in Chief.

There’s no charge and no registration to attend. Just drop by and have fun.

All of this rises out of that survey you completed this summer. You said you’d like more social events in the club. About half the people who responded to the survey said they’d come to a pure social gathering like this one.

Fun sailing on Tempe Town Lake. Photo: Debbra Heisler

Let the Season Begin!

After a summer of quiet Wednesday night races, it was great to see Tempe Town Lake teeming with boats Sunday (9/10) on the first day of TTL Racing and RC Training and the first day of ASF Opti classes.

The wind was a little light and the temperatures a bit, well, hot, but it was a fun day anyway. Vice Commodore and Laser sailor Mike Bernard led an effort to add gates to TTL racing and they were used for the first time this day.

Race results are here.

The Buccaneer fleet topped out at four entries for the season, which meant they were combined with the Portsmouth fleet and worked race committee.

Natalie Harper leads the Opti 1 class at Tempe Town Lake. Photo: Mike Ferring

 

Back on Trailers; All’s Right with the World

Dog Years is lifted back onto its trailer after being knocked over in the July monsoon storm. Photo: Wendy Larsen

An outpouring of help Saturday (7/22), including a crane and a forklift, put humpty dumpty back on the wall again.

It will be quite some time before Pleasant Harbor Marina is fully operational, but AYC’s members picked their boats off the hard gravel of the dry storage yard and plopped them back on trailers where they belong.

Dog Year, the Mini 650 of Wendy Larsen and Dave Christensen, was the most damaged, with a big hole and some small ones needing repair. Fortunately, Dave has intimate knowledge of the innards of Dog Years and knows how to fix it. In fact, he’s had to repair damage twice before.

Steve Kusic’s boat had a mangled stern pulpit and a mangled trailer. Bruce Andress now has the boat on one of his trailers and will do the repairs.

All of the boats were put upright shortly after dawn Saturday following the damage a week earlier from blows from opening monsoons. Pleasant Harbor Marina isn’t doing as well. Damages there will take a long time to repair, though the marina reports that water and power have now been restored. They’re referring people to the PHM Facebook page.

Lots of hands help drop Steve Kusic’s mast on Runaway. The boat was back on a trailer and headed for repair. Photo: Mike Ferring

The walkway was still closed Saturday morning, July 22, after the monsoon storms. Photo: Mike Ferring

Shockwave Finishes the Transpac

After correcting for handicap, these are the finishing times for Shockwave’s division. She’s the fifth boat. The numbers show days/hours/minutes/seconds.

Mike and Jo Grijalva and their predominantly AYC crew arrived at the finish line of the Transpac at 11:44 am Hawaii time Tuesday, July 17.

They were placed 5th in their division, but after two weeks in the Pacific, the corrected times of the entire division were within a few hours of each other.

Ricky Gilchrist eyes the arrival pineapple warily. After two weeks at sea, they’re ready for a real cocktail! Photo: Al Lehman

Al and Sandy Lehman greeted son Santa Claus, oops, Al Jr., in Honolulu.